Clip of the Day: Saving Adorable Puppies After Hurricane Isaac

The Humane Society is taking care of animals up and down the Gulf Coast.

In the wake of Hurricane Isaac, the Humane Society of the United States transferred nearly 200 dogs and cats from animal shelters in affected areas to other locations to make room for rescued pets.

“When a natural disaster hits, it really takes all agencies to come together and make this a successful response and save as many animals as possible,” says Humane Society’s Niki Dawson in the video.

Hurricane Isaac, which ran through the Gulf Coast in late August, deeply affected areas of Louisiana and Mississippi.

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The Humane Society is working in Louisiana and Mississippi to transport pets from local animal shelters. (Photo: The Humane Society of the U.S.)

“There are areas of the parish that have been hit worse than we were in Katrina,” says a narrator from the Humane Society in this video.

To pitch in, the Humane Society traveled to Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, and worked with a local animal shelter to help care for lost and stray pets, wrote president Wayne Pacelle on the Humane Society blog.

Over Labor Day weekend, the Humane Society’s team took more than 160 homeless pets to centers in other states, such as the Humane Society of Charlotte, North Carolina and emergency partners in Maryland.

Dogs and cats weren’t the only ones needing help: the Humane Society went to Mississippi to rescue more than 20 horses and took pets to shelters in Alabama.

“Transports like these ease the burden on local shelters affected by disasters and give these animals a better chance of finding loving homes,” Pacelle wrote.

Our favorite part of this video? All of the heartwarming puppies, starting at 1:24. Help out these pups by visiting the Humane Society’s donation page.

How would you care for your pet in the case of a disaster? Let us know in the comments.

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Kelly Zhou hails from the Bay Area and is currently a student in Los Angeles. She has written on a variety of topics, predominantly focusing on politics and education. Email Kelly | @kelllyzhou | TakePart.com