Viral Video Encourages Women to 'Lay Their Boobs on Stuff' for an Important Cause

Wearing pink may be tradition, but this newest breast cancer awareness project is all about #Mamming.

A Bay Area native, Andri Antoniades has previously worked as a fashion industry journalist and a medical writer.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and though this is the time of year we love to wrap absolutely everything we own and buy in the color pink, there's a new way to further the cause—by "laying your boobs on stuff." 

#Mamming is a social media campaign that's kind of like planking, or owling—except with breasts. Created by advertising executives Michelle Lamont, who's a 25-year-old breast cancer survivor, and Michele Jaret, its point is to use levity to take the awkwardness out of breast cancer screenings and encourage women to get regular doctor-administered mammograms.

Participating is simple: Women take photos of themselves laying their (clothed) breasts on shelves, tabletops, or whatever surfaces they can find, apply the hashtag #Mamming to those photos and post them across social media sites. 

But men are encouraged to participate too by doing the same, and so far, many have. 

Photo: #Mamming/Instagram

One in eight women will receive a breast cancer diagnosis at some point in her life. Almost a quarter of a million new cases will be diagnosed this year. The Susan G. Komen Foundation recommends that regular doctor-administered mammograms start at the age of 40, though women with a history of breast cancer in their families may need to start earlier.

Regardless of age, all women are encouraged to administer breast self-exams monthly. Early detection remains a key factor in survival. 

While it's true that the thought of having a mammogram performed isn't exactly an alluring one for most women, #Mamming takes the intimidation factor out of it by showing that it's actually easy, it's important and you can in fact do it. 

Here are some recent user-submitted photos from the campaign. 

(Photos: Instagram)

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