Social Courage in School: How to Teach Kids to Do the Right Thing

Parenting expert Annie Fox offers advice for parents and teachers on how to help kids become moral leaders.

Parenting expert Annie Fox shares insight on how to help your kids build strong character and become moral leaders. (Photo: Paul Viant)

Each week parenting expert Annie Fox will share her wit and wisdom for teaching kids to be good people and strong learners.


Whenever I communicate from a school stage or from my computer, I tell students that our choices should reflect the kind of people we really are. Most of us are good people who care about others. We have a strong sense of fairness. We like to be helpful. We try to understand the other person’s point of view.

Very few of us are truly “mean.” And yet, we often exhibit downright mean behavior (online and off). Whenever I get the chance, I challenge students to think about why that’s the case. I also challenge them to stand up for what’s right, acknowledging that it’s not always easy, especially when no one is standing with you.

Most kids older than the age of five, really do know the difference between right and wrong. But they don’t always do the right thing. Our 21st-century culture of cruelty coupled with a sense of entitlement has taught kids (and many adults) that looking out for anyone but themselves is a sign of weakness.

More: What Every Parent Should Know: How to Help Your Kids Deal With Peer Conflicts at School

Being kind to a popular kid, however, will likely earn a student some popularity points of his/her own. But being kind to an “underdog,” especially when popular kids are watching, well, that can be a high-risk move. So can turning down a demand from another student to copy from one's test paper or refusing to cheat in other ways (using the Internet or cell phones). And so, kids may feel stuck between their natural inclinations to do the right thing vs. doing whatever it takes to be liked.

With that, it's time for parents and teachers to spend more time and attention on helping students develop the social courage it takes to stand up and be moral leaders. This excerpt from my book Teaching Kids to Be Good People, provides a simple way for educators (or parents) to begin lessons in social courage.

Share this quote with students: “The time is always right to do what is right.” — Martin Luther King, Jr.

­Ask, “What do you think about this? Is it true? Too simplistic?”

­Talk about a time when you or someone else was being treated unfairly and you stepped up and did the right thing. What happened?

­Talk about a time when you didn’t help promote respect, peace, and fairness. What held you back?

­Create a challenge to increase your acts of social courage over the next few weeks. You’ll need paper strips (11 x 2 inches), tape, and a pen.

  • Think about a time you stepped up and did the right thing when someone needed a friend or a message of peace. Write a sentence about what you did on a strip of paper and sign your name.
  • Connect your strip with someone else’s and create “links” using tape.
  • Got more than one act of social courage? Make another link!

Each day keep adding to the chain by actively looking for opportunities to be “brave” in situations where someone needs to do the right thing. Talk about any positive changes you notice in yourself, your classmates, your school (or in your family).

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