Burger King Rolls Out Bacon Sundae

Surprise: The chain’s new dessert contains 510 calories and 18 grams of fat.
Does any ice cream dessert really need bacon? (Photo: Eater.com)
Jun 12, 2012
Nichol Nelson hails from Minnesota, but has worked in food journalism in New York and Los Angeles for more than a decade. She served as an editor with Gourmet magazine for six years, and has contributed to several other digital and print food publications.

That creepy plastic king mascot is finally out of the picture, but Burger King isn’t going to accept their shrinking market share without a fight. In a bid to attract attention to their upcoming summer menu, the fast-food chain is introducing a 510-calorie bacon sundae.

Pairing ice cream and bacon is becoming quite a trend: Jack in the Box rolled out a bacon milkshake in February, and Denny’s put a maple bacon sundae on its menu in 2011.

Burger King’s version skips the maple and goes straight for hot fudge—and caramel. Vanilla soft serve is drenched with both sauces, then sprinkled with bacon bits and served with an additional slice of bacon, reports the Associated Press. It contains a staggering 18 grams of fat and 61 grams of sugar—that’s more than 14 teaspoons of the sweet stuff.

While fast-food gluttony is nothing new, the sundae does represent somewhat of a departure for the chain, which introduced an expanded menu earlier this year with healthier choices such as salads, smoothies, and wraps.

But in the world of fast food, it’s all about profit, and BK execs likely took note of the fanfare that accompanied the bacon dessert launches of their competitors.

And why not? KFC made a huge splash with their monstrous Double Down sandwich last year, and, as the AP points out, Taco Bell’s Doritos Locos Taco has become “the most successful product launch in the chain’s history,” with 100 million sold in the 10 weeks following its launch in March.

They keep serving this stuff up, and we keep eating it. So who’s to blame, the restaurants or the consumers?

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