One In Ten Adults Will Be Diabetic in 20 Years

Without urgent action, 552 million will be living with disease in 2030.

Exec. Prod. of Franchises & Series. He previously reported for HuffPost, L.A. Daily Journal, and Biloxi Sun-Herald.

The world is on a crash course for an explosion in the number of global diabetes cases unless governments and individuals take serious action soon, the International Diabetes Federation warned Monday. 

According to current projections, 552 million people — 1 in 10 adults worldwide — are expected to be living with diabetes in 2030. That works out to three new cases every ten seconds, or 10 million new cases a year. 

And the worst part of all of this — aside from the huge strain such an explosion would place on the global health care system — is that many of the cases are entirely preventable. Most of the rise will be attributed to Type 2 Diabetes, the form of the disease linked to an unhealthy diet and less active lifestyle. 

In other words: the planet needs to put down the KFC Double Down and take up pilates. 

“In every country and in every community worldwide, we are losing the battle against this cruel and deadly disease” said Jean Claude Mbanya, President of the International Diabetes Federation in a statement. 

The figures released by Mbanya's group on Monday as part of World Diabetes Day paint an especially bleak picture of the diabetic future for the developing world. Cases of the disease in Africa are expected to soar by 90 percent by 2030. Already, nearly 78 percent of the people of diabetics in Africa don't know they're living with the disease, and are not receiving treatment. 

According to the IDF, the US already has one of the highest rates of death due to diabetes of any country in the world, with nearly 180,000 a year.

Want to know how you can do your part to prove the IDF's crystal ball wrong? You can start by learning how you can Stop Diabetes with the American Diabetes Association

Related Stories on TakePart

Get More

Takepart’s Most Popular

From The Web

Comments ()